Author Chats Literary Inspirations with Azalea Ellis Writer of Gods of Blood and Bone

We asked Azalea Ellis who her Literary Inspirations were and why. This is what she said…

Like most writers, I read a lot as a child. Some of those stories and world definitely influenced my desire to write and molded my view of the world.

Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy.

This series has an unforgettable charm, a certain spark of life that calls to the child in all of us.

Garth Nix’s Abhorsen trilogy.

This series introduced me to a new way of looking at magic. I felt excited, and a little sneaky, as I realized that darkness could be the used for good, and that morality and even power are in the eyes of the beholder.

Tamora Pierce’s Tortall world books.

I adored reading about girls who were the heroes of their own stories, even when those types of “adventure” slots were usually taken by boys.

Brandon Sanderson’s Mistborn trilogy.

This series had a big impact on me, because it subverted my expectations of what it means to be a hero, a savior, and a revolutionist. Heroes are important, but sometimes our heroes aren’t the messiah figures that stand out the most. When the hero falls, step up and become your own hero.

J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series.

Magic. The whimsical world Rowling built has always felt just on the other side of real, and I think that’s why it’s captivated so many people.

Orson Scott Card’s Ender’s Game.

I remember being overjoyed as a child to read a book where all the young characters weren’t idiots. I wondered if, when people got to be adults, they forgot that they once had brains when they were children. This book may have been the start of my search for well-written intelligence.

Patrick Rothfuss’ Name of the Wind.

Rothfuss’ prose, worldbuilding, and main character are works of art. This is my favorite book, and I think it’s a great example of how you can make people fall so in love with your characters and world that it feels almost real to them. I also have a soft spot for hypercompetence in my characters, especially when it’s offset with very real flaws.

Cynthia Voight’s A Solitary Blue

I read this book during the beginning of my adolescense, and it has always stuck with me. The reality that you can’t depend on those you should most be able to, and that your heroes are only human felt very true. Yet, the impetus is on us, as we become adults, to forge our own world and life, no matter what obstacles may stad in our way.

L.A. Meyer’s Bloody Jack

Once again, I loved seeing a girl kicking ass and taking names in a predominately male role–and even disguised as a male.

Jack London’s Call of the Wild

This is the first “real” book I ever read completely of my own free will, around the age of 5. I was given the illustrated version by a family friend along with some other classic books, and I thought I would like this one the least, so I read it first to save the best for last. I started just as evening fell, and by the time I was meant to go to bed, I was begging my mother for just a little while longer so I could figure out what happened to Buck.

Gods of Blood and Bone is the first book in the Seeds of Chaos series, a LitRPG/GameLit book that combines science fiction and game elements.

Fans of Ready Player One, Red Rising, and The Hunger Games will likely enjoy this series.

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