Erotic Mysteries Author’s Interview with  Elsa Joseph 

Erotic Mysteries Author’s Interview with  Elsa Joseph 

  1. What literary pilgrimages have you gone on? I live in London and in the past have attended The London Book Fair. I’ve connected with some great authors there.
  2. What is the first book that made you cry? Me Before You by JoJo Moyes is indeed a tear-jerker,
  3. What is the most unethical practice in the publishing industry? Paying readers to review an author’s book.
  4. Does writing energize or exhaust you? Both. When I’m writing a new book I’m always fired up and rearing to go. Once I get into the process of writing I’m exhausted, especially when I have problems with plotlines and have to re-write a large proportion of my work.
  5. What are common traps for aspiring writers? Today’s reality is that everybody can become a published author thanks to the proliferation of self-publishing resources. Many aspiring authors feel that success is just around the corner for them too, so they start planning their promotional campaign before they even finish chapter one of the book.
  6. Have you ever gotten reader’s block? I have experienced writers block. I’ve sat at my laptop for hours not knowing what to write next and stuck for ideas.
  7. Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym? No, I like my name. I also think that when you write under a pseudonym and you don’t want to reveal your true identity, you’re automatically at a disadvantage. It’s hard enough to get people who know you to buy and read your book, let alone people who don’t have or don’t know they have an association with the author.
  8. Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want? I write mainly romance fiction and with each book I try to offer my readers something different.
  9. Do you think someone could be a writer if they don’t feel emotions strongly? No, you need to put yourself in the character’s shoes, imagine how he/she feels. Readers like to be touched, moved, by a story. If you want to reach the reader’s emotions, you need to write emotion-evoking scenes.
  10. What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer? I have a few writer friends. We support each other by reading and critiquing each other’s work.
  11. Do you want each book to stand on its own, or are you trying to build a body of work with connections between each book? At the moment all the books I have written have been stand-alone-books. I do aspire to write a book series.
  12. How did publishing your first book change your process of writing? I made a lot of errors when I published my first book. For example, I think I annoyed my readers by withholding key information in an effort to create suspense. I have since learned that failing to give readers what they want doesn’t create suspense, it causes dissatisfaction.
  13. What does literary success look like to you? I view literary success as when one’s book is still commonly available and well-regarded for many years after publication, even after the author’s death.
  14. What’s the best way to market your books? The rise of social media has made it easier than ever for writers to get their work in the hands of thousands of readers
  15. Do you view writing as a kind of spiritual practice? Yes, most definitely. I think Graham Greene’s quote defines the craft beautifully: “Writing is a form of therapy; sometimes I wonder how all those who do not write, compose, or paint can manage to escape the madness, melancholia, the panic and fear which is inherent in a human situation.”― Graham Greene,
  16. Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones? Yes, I read what readers have to say about my work. I take bad reviews with a pinch of salt.
  17. What is your favorite childhood book? The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
  18. Does your family support your career as a writer? Yes, my family is very supportive of my work.
  19. How long on average does it take you to write a book? My latest book Chloe After Dark took one year to write.
  20. Do you believe in writer’s block? Cliché or not, I have experienced writers block. I’ve sat at my laptop for hours not knowing what to write next and stuck for ideas.